October 1st 2019 7 AM KRPS Newscast

A federal court is publicly reprimanding a judge in Kansas for allegedly sexually harassing employees and showing up late to court. Nomin Ujiyediin of the Kansas News Service reports.

Democratic Kansas Governor Laura Kelly calls Medicaid expansion her top priority for the legislative session next year, but she’s warning lawmakers to avoid some restrictions that other states have tried.

A Republican state senator from St. Charles, Missouri says a six-person Conservative Caucus is seeking to expand its membership. St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum has more from Sen. Bill Eye-Gul’s appearance on the Politically Speaking podcast.

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September 26 2019 8 AM KRPS Newscast

There’s an increasingly common sight in Kansas’ K through 12 schools – local businesses. As Stephan Bisaha of the Kansas News Service reports, it’s something the state is trying out now to help its labor force in the future

The ripple effects of the General Motors strike, now in its second week, have led to the layoff of 66 maintenance workers at the Fairfax assembly plant in Kansas City, Kansas. KCUR’s Dan Margolies reports.

September 26 2019 7 AM KRPS Newscast

A new report shows 51 thousand Kansas children live in neighborhoods with significant levels of poverty. Nomin Ujiyediin of the Kansas News Service reports.

Kansas industries that are short on talent are spending more time in the state’s classrooms, recruiting future workers. Last year, K-12 schools saw a jump in businesses coming to classes and in students visiting workplaces, according to the Kansas State Department of Education.

Members of the Missouri and Illinois congressional delegations are reacting to the escalating threat of impeachment against President Donald Trump. St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum reports that the responses are falling along partisan lines.

The Washington Cornett and Sackbutt Ensemble visits Pittsburg State

The Washington Cornett and Sackbutt Ensemble

Friday, Septmeber 27 2019 marks the start of another exciting season of the Pittsburg State Solo and Chamber Music Series with a performance by the renowned Washington Cornett and Sackbutt Ensemble. The group who call Virginia home will make their first visit to southeast Kansas later this week. Micheal Holmes, the artistic director of the ensemble says that about 25-years ago he was signing in a group named “Music Antigua” in the Washington D.C. area when he met a sackbutt player by the name of Michael O’Connor who was seeking out other brass players to play with. From humbling beginnings, The Washington Cornett and Sackbutt Ensemble was born.

Director Michael Holmes speaking about the formation of The Washington Cornett and Sackbutt Ensemble

Today, the ensemble is one of the most sought out of us its kind because of the late Renaissance and early Baroque era western music that it plays. That, in addition to it’s unique instruments such as the sackbutt, which was a precursor to what we call the trombone today. The earliest recorded history of the sackbutt dates back to 1511 as the Washington Cornett and Sackbutt Ensemble plays to recreate the music that audiences enjoyed back then. At the time, Michael had no idea that the group would travel and perform across the US like it does today.

What started as a two-man group as grown in a 22-year career for Michael Holmes traveling and performing
A BBb contra-bass sackbut by Georg Nikolaus Öller, 1639, Stockholm. The Swedish Museum of Performing Arts.

One of the unique aspects about The Washington Cornett and Sackbutt Ensemble is that they work to recreate music that was written and played between 300 and 500 years ago. They take into account every possible aspect from instruments, to intonation and articulation to where their concerts were performed. It was common for performances to take place between 300-500 years ago inside of churches, which at the time were usually made of stone. The ensemble attempts to transport audiences back to a different time of music discovery.

Think you know music? Transport yourself back 500-years with the music of The Washington Cornett and Sackbutt Ensemble
Duke Chapel at Duke University Durham, North Carolina

The most important thing to the ensemble is performing the music as close to the way that it was written. According to Michael the written music does not change, but the performers or directors conception of it can. The ensemble is so detailed that they use exact number of signers and players per musical piece to as closely match what was heard in those early performances. It’s a constant struggle between how modern musicians are taught and how they hear music and envisioning pieces that was never recorded and trying to replicate it.

Holmes explains how meticulous the ensemble is in performing

September 24 2019 8 AM KRPS Newcast

Kansas high schoolers could end up taking one fewer state test. As Stephan Bisaha of the Kansas News Service reports, education officials are considering replacing one test with the ACT.

With the possibility that the money coming into its state highway fund will stagnate in the next few years, Kansas is considering taxing drivers on where and how long they drive, as opposed to how many gallons of gas they buy.

Kansas City Royals general manager Dayton Moore didn’t offer a timetable Tuesday when it comes to hiring a successor to retiring manager Ned Yost. But as Greg Echlin reports for KCUR 89.3, Moore talked about the parameters and the process.

September 25 2019 7 AM KRPS Newscast

Kansas is expected to increase its spending on foster care, food stamps and other human services by more than $200 million dollars over the next three years. Nomin Ujiyediin of the Kansas News Service has the details.

With the possibility that the money coming into its state highway fund will stagnate in the next few years, Kansas is considering taxing drivers on where and how long they drive, as opposed to how many gallons of gas they buy

Former Secretary of State John Kerry believes that Democrats can be competitive again in places like Missouri. St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum has more on what the 2004 Democratic presidential nominee has to say about his party’s prospects in the Show Me State.

September 24 2019 8 AM KRPS Newcast

Federal prosecutors have charged a Fort Riley infantry soldier with coaching people online on how to make bombs. Celia Llopis-Jepsen of the Kansas News Service has more details.

The NCAA alleges that the University of Kansas men’s basketball team has committed a string of major rules violations. Erica Hunzinger has more on the school’s response.

A special Missouri legislative session on vehicle tax breaks cost roughly $70,000 to hold.

September 24 2019 7 AM KRPS Newscast

Cell towers and the headquarters of a major news network — those were among the targets that federal prosecutors say a Fort Riley soldier envisioned attacking. Celia Llopis-Jepsen of the Kansas News Service has more.

For people who suffer from Asthma, this is what’s known as Peak Week. It’s the time of year when doctors see the most asthma attacks. High ragweed pollen counts generally align with the early weeks of school .

One out of three Missouri participants in Medicare’s prescription drug program were prescribed opioids last year, more than the national rate of 29%, according to a newly released government report. Dan Margolies has more

Learning about the Alpha-gal allergy with John Hacker

John Hacker speaking about his reporting on Alpha-gal
John Hacker

Tick bites can be part of regular life when you live in the Four States. In fact, the area is perfect place for ticks to both live and thrive. They love moist, humid environments and live on deer, birds, squirrels, rodents and yes, humans. Once a tick bites you it can lead to a variety of after effects including rash, headache, nausea and it can even make you allergic to mammal meat.

Recently, John Hacker of Carl Junction wrote an article published in the Joplin Globe highlighting how lone star tick bites are making people allergic to both mammal meat and by-products of mammal meat. In the article John details how Joplin resident Nikki Shaw got bit by a tick during the summer of 2018. Like most people though, she didn’t recall getting bit and only after getting sick multiple times and going to the doctor on several occasions was she diagnosed with alpha-gal syndrome.

This has lead to the formation of the Joplin Area Alpha Gal Awareness Group which will meet for the third time on Thursday October 3 at 5:30 at the Joplin Public Library. The meetings allow those who have alpha-gal syndrome to share their stories, food recipes and speak with Dr. Tina Merritt an allergist who was the special guest speaker at the group’s September get together. The groups meetings are open to the public.

Listeners of the public radio science show Radio Lab this weekend heard a story about alpha-gal syndrome, the lone star tick and how meat-lover Amy Pearl came to find out that she had been bitten by the tick only after getting sick multiple times.

September 23 2019 8 AM KRPS Newscast

Kansas emergency rooms fare well in a new look at hospitals nationwide by investigative reporting outlet ProPublica. Celia Llopis-Jepsen of the Kansas News Service reports.

People in a few Kansas cities joined worldwide climate strike protests Friday, calling for world and local leaders to act on climate change. While not nearly as large as protests in major U-S cities, the small group gathered in Wichita was still enthusiastic.

Several hundred UAW workers and allies swarmed the main entrance to the Fairfax GM plant in K-C-K yesterday as Democratic Presidential hopeful Joe Biden stopped by for a visit.