‘The Rundown’ News Headlines from KRPS for 07.31.20

 Good morning, thanks for joining me for KRPS news headlines for Friday, July 31th. 

Outside groups are pouring millions of dollars into the Republican race for Kansas’ open U.S. Senate seat. 

The fate of several high-profile issues could turn on the results of key primaries for the Kansas Legislature. 

On Thursday, the Joplin Schools Board of Education approved to push back the start of school to late August.

Next week’s primary could trigger a power shift in the Kansas Legislature … one ne that could intensify battles over Democratic Governor Laura Kelly’s coronavirus response powers and issues like Medicaid expansion, taxes and abortion.

Outside groups are pouring millions of dollars into the Kansas Republican primary for the U.S. Senate for a reason, says Washburn University political scientist Bob Beatty. 

The State of Missouri crossed a grim milestone in its efforts to slow the spread of COVID-19. 

And now for our feature of the day, we profile 7th Congressional District candidate Camille Olive-Lombardi. 

Also, don’t forget to subscribe to The Rundown from K R P S, available in Google Podcast and the Apple iTunes store. 

Check back tomorrow for more news headlines from the Four States on KRPS. 

‘The Rundown’ News Headlines from KRPS for 07.29.20

Good morning, thanks for joining me for KRPS news headlines for Wednesday, July 29th. 

Mainly cloudy skies and a 60 percent chance of showers after 9 this morning throughout the Four States today, a high of 82. Another night of mostly cloudy skies tonight, also a 50 percent chance of showers and storms, a low of 71. 

The governing body of high school sports in Kansas decided against delaying fall sports and activities Tuesday.

As of Tuesday afternoon, Kansas election officials have mailed out more than 300,000 mail-in ballots. That’s more than six times as many in 2016. The ballots must be postmarked by August 4. 

On Tuesday, the Missouri Senate held the first hearing of the special legislative session on violent crime. 

Kansas voting advocates say a new court ruling will help voters fix problems with their ballots so they are ultimately counted. 

Missouri lawmakers are back in Jefferson City for a special session on violent crime. 

The University of Missouri System Curators held a meeting via Zoom Tuesday afternoon to discuss possible changes to the System.       

Today, we have two features for you, primaries in Missouri and Kansas take place next week on Tuesday, August 4th. Today we’ll meet one of the Republican candidates in Missouri 7th Congressional District,  Steve Chinek. 

And now over to Kansas, this spring, Lansing Correctional Facility in northeast Kansas was home to one of the largest coronavirus outbreaks in the U-S. In June, the Kansas Department of Corrections announced it had successfully contained the outbreak. Now, as cases are at their highest levels in the state, and the prison system is preparing for a rise in cases behind bars, inmates say virus precautions are still lacking. Nomin Ujiyediin of the Kansas News Service reports. 

KRPS’S  Kansas News Service reports on health, the many factors that influence it and their connection to public policy.  Find more at ksnewsservice.org

Also, don’t forget to subscribe to The Rundown from K R P S, available in Google Podcast and the Apple iTunes store. 

 Check back tomorrow for more news headlines from the Four States on KRPS. 

Missouri 7th Congressional District Primary Candidate – (R) Camille Olive-Lombardi

 

Camille Olive-Lombardi

Out of the 3 Republicans that KRPS profiled for Missouri’s 7th Congressional district, only one has run for Congress previously, Camille Olive-Lombardi. She ran as a Democrat two years ago. Today she backs President Trump and is a member of the Republican party. During our interview, she spoke about being born-in and raised by parents that were Democrats but that over the previous two years, she found herself passionately agreeing more with the GOP.

Olive-Lombardi says that she decided to run again because she doesn’t see the values that she identifies with in her representatives in Washington D.C. She also says that she see’s ‘scared people’ that aren’t willing to take on the Washington establishment and Nancy Pelosi. During the interview Olive-Lombardi says the significant difference between her and the other candidates (4 men) is that she isn’t scared of Pelosi, that she grew up in a Democratic family and strongly objects to how far left the party has gone.

Another interesting difference that sets Olive-Lombardi apart from the other four candidates is that she has traveled overseas, spending time in Afghanistan working for charitable organizations. It’s evident that her time in the war-torn country has help shape how she sees both the world and how the US interacts with other countries. It also has brought her a greater appreciation for the freedom and rights that we have in the US, especially for women. It’s all apart of her fiery views on both the politics of Missouri’s 7th District and the status of the US in 2020.

For voter information or to find your polling places visit the Missouri Secretary of States office by clicking this link.

Missouri 7th Congressional District Primary Candidate – (R) Eric Harleman

Eric Harleman is not a politician. He’s a businessman that runs a company installing and fixing garage doors in Southwest Missouri. Eric resides in Sparta and firmly believes that the people (us) need to take our voice back in Washington, D.C. He’s also a one topic candidate, not to take anything away from the importance of that subject or the passion that Eric has for it. If elected, Eric would work towards implementing a system online, where citizens and residents across the country would be able to read, understand, and then vote on the bills that we pay taxes towards. In a word, Eric Harleman wants transparency

 

He’s been on the campaign trail for a year now throughout Southwest. He’s been on the campaign trail for a year throughout Southwest Missouri. Through his garage door business, Harleman says that he meets people of all political backgrounds and beliefs. One of the things that has surprised him when talking about politics is that some of his possible constituents are waiting to see who Joe Biden will choose as his vice president.

Most of all, Harleman wants to update how residents interact with their government. He speaks with passion, saying that ‘we don’t live in the horse and buggy days any longer,’ and wants US citizens to have more control over what goes on in Washington DC, and that it should be available online. Finally, I asked Harleman to give voters across Missouri’s 7th Congressional District his best pitch.

For voter information and where to find your local polling place, click this link to the Missouri Secretary of State’s office.

Missouri 7th Congressional District Primary Candidate – (R) Steve Chentnik

Steve Chentik at the 2019 Maple Leaf Festival

Elections throughout the US have been upended by the pandemic making it difficult for those known in political circles to campaign. But it has made it more challenging for those looking to break-in and win elections from the outside. That’s Steve Chentnik. Currently he resides in the Branson area, but previously lived in Webb City and Oronogo, Missouri. Steve is retired from a 40-year career in Manufacturing, including at Leggett and Platt in Carthage and Springfield Re-manufacturing Co. in Springfield. He’s been political for several years, but in 2019 he decided to step out of the shadows and run for office for the first time.

Steve is pro-2nd amendment, pro-life, and against judicial overreach. He also believes that former Congresspeople and Senators should not be able to become lobbyists until at least 3 -years after they leave office. He is for very tight restrictions at our borders but also understands the need for immigration into the US but says that it needs to be tightly controlled and regulated. Most passionately, Steve believes that the US healthcare system is a failure and needs to be massively overhauled, and he speaks from personal experience.

Steve started his campaign last July and has been trying to get his name out there ever since. He admits that it has been a challenge doing so because of the pandemic, but meeting people who are just as passionate about the US and politics has electrified him. According to Steve, the topic that comes up the most is term limits when speaking with possible constituents. He says that the states and US residents must pass a referendum to force limits on Congresspeople and Senators because they aren’t going to pass term limits on themselves.

If you ask Steve why he’s running for Congress during a global pandemic that has limited the amount of time that they can get to ‘press the flesh’ in person, Steve will tell you it’s because he’s a fighter. He believes that the people (you and me) are losing this country to those who we elect to office and that these officeholders they create protections, which makes it much more difficult to vote them out of office. He is also tired of career politicians voting yes or no on bills with little thought except how they could personally benefit.

Click this link to visit Missouri’s Voter Outreach Center and to locate your polling place

‘The Rundown’ News Headlines from KRPS for 07.28.20

Good morning, thanks for joining me for KRPS news headlines for Tuesday, July 28th. 

Cloudy skies are expected throughout the Four States today, with a 60 percent chance of thunderstorms, a high of 86. Mostly cloudy conditions are expected tonight, chance of storms remains around 60 percent, a low of 71. 

The number of new COVID cases in Kansas rose by more than a thousand over the weekend, which has the governor thinking it’s time to cut back on gathering. 

Tornado Alley has been unusually quiet this year, especially in Kansas. So far there have only been 24 reported tornadoes in the state … mostly in far western Kansas near the Colorado border.

City officials in Joplin held their COVID-19 weekly update on Monday. Since June 2nd, the city has remained in Step 2 of Phase 2 of the cities COVID response and recovery plan. Joplin’s Health Department reports 55 active cases within the city limit; the number has remained unchanged for two weeks. Joplin Mayor Ryan Stanley says this is not the time to back down and be complacent as the number of cases has stabilized.  

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment says it will conduct a spot treatment for blue-green algae later today at the state’s largest reservoir. 

Monday was the first day of the legislative session that Missouri Governor Mike Parson, but much of the work will take place after the primary elections that take place one week from today. 

And now our feature of the day, 

For 3 months, people living in a mobile home community in western Kansas have had to boil their tap water or use bottled water. Sometimes their taps just went dry … the pressure often too weak. 

KRPS’S Kansas News Service reports on health, the many factors that influence it and their connection to public policy. 

Also, don’t forget to subscribe to The Rundown from K R P S, available in Google Podcast and the Apple iTunes store. 

Check back tomorrow for more news headlines from the Four States on KRPS. 

The Rundown: News Headlines from KRPS for 07.27.20

Good morning, thanks for joining me for KRPS news headlines for Monday, July 27nd. 

Partly cloudy to mostly cloudy skies throughout the Four States today, with a chance of showers before 11 this afternoon and a 70 percent chance of thunderstorms this afternoon, a high of 84. Cloudy conditions both today and tonight, chance of storms at 50 percent, lows in the lower ‘70s, highs tomorrow in the mid-’80s. 

 If you’ve received seeds in the mail you didn’t order, the Kansas Department of Agriculture asks you not to put them in the ground.

The Kansas Insurance Department is reminding people that coronavirus tests should generally be covered by insurance without copays and similar costs. That’s a federal law, and insurers aren’t always following it. 

Missouri Governor Mike Parson has called a special legislative session that will start later this morning in Jefferson City. The Governor is looking to put some political space between his comments recently that kids returning to school next month will get sick with COVID-19 and the rising number of infections in the state. 

The Kansas Department of Corrections says inmates have tested positive for new coronavirus cases in three prisons. 

A former Kansas legislative leader who spearheaded the renovation of the state Capitol building has died. Dick Bond was president of the Kansas Senate from 1997 through 2001. 

 A special session of the Missouri legislature will convene later this morning in Jefferson City. The session is expected to focus on slowing the rates of violent crimes and homicides in the state. 

Also, don’t forget to subscribe to The Rundown from K R P S, available in Google Podcast and the Apple iTunes store. 

Check back tomorrow for more news headlines from the Four States on KRPS.

‘The Rundown’ News Headlines from KRPS from 07.24.20

Good morning, thanks for joining me for KRPS news headlines for Friday, July 24nd. 

Mostly sunny once again today throughout the Four States today, still a 20 percent chance of thunderstorms after 11 this morning, a high of 92. Mainly clear tonight, that 20 percent chance of storms lingers before 8 tonight, a low of 73.  

The University of Kansas already has plans to help control the coronavirus on campus, like testing all students and staff. 

It’s been just over a week since Republican Kansas Congressman Steve Watkins was charged with felonies related to voter registration, and it’s shifting the dynamics of his re-election race. 

The Cornell Arts and Entertainment Complex is scheduled to break ground in early 2021, according to Connect 2 Culture. The 46,000 square foot structure is being built in what is now the parking lot of Joplin’s Memorial Hall. But what is the future of Memorial Hall? Joplin has commissioned a survey to help figure out the future of the hall that was built in 1924. 

Wichita’s Board of Education voted to push back the start of school until after Labor Day. 

Governor Laura Kelly says two officers in the Kansas Highway Patrol are no longer with the agency and an investigation of the state’s top trooper has found no violations.

St. Louis University and Washington University plan to test several coronavirus vaccines in humans.

And now our feature of the day,  Kansas voters can already cast an early ballot in the upcoming August 4th election. One race to look out for is the Republican third district primary, where five candidates are vying for the chance to unseat Democratic Congresswoman Sharice Davids. For the Kansas News Service, Aviva Okeson-Haberman has more on how candidates are getting out their message in the final weeks of the campaign. 

Also, don’t forget to subscribe to The Rundown from K R P S, available in Google Podcast and the Apple iTunes store. 

Check back tomorrow for more news headlines from the Four States on KRPS. 

‘The Rundown’ News Headlines from KRPS for 07.23.20

Good morning, thanks for joining me for KRPS news headlines for Thursday, July 23nd. 

Sunny and warm once again today throughout Southeast Kansas, a high of 92. Partly cloudy with light winds tonight, a low of 72. Mostly sunny again tomorrow, 20 percent chance of isolated thunderstorms tomorrow afternoon, a high of 91. 

A new public health order in Sedgwick County shuts down bars and nightclubs for a month… as part of the latest effort to prevent coronavirus infections.

For every positive case of the coronavirus in Kansas, the state needs to contact an average of 10 people to let them know they’ve been exposed to the virus. 

Missouri teachers are worried about getting sick when and if they return to their classrooms this fall. 

K-12 schools in Kansas can reopen as currently scheduled. As Stephan Bisaha of the Kansas News Service reports, Governor Laura Kelly failed to get the State Board of Education’s support Wednesday to delay the start statewide until after Labor Day.

Missouri Governor Mike Parson was on the defensive Wednesday during a COVID-19 briefing. He continued to defend himself on comments he made on a St. Louis talk show last week regarding schools reopening and students getting sick with COVID-19.

And now our feature of the day, Missouri has been mulling over the idea of expanding Medicaid… the public health insurance program for low-income people… for years. But, voters will finally get to decide in the August 4th primary.  St. Louis Public Radio’s statehouse reporter Jaclyn Driscoll breaks down the expansion question and what you need to know ahead of casting your vote. 

For more information on the expansion plan, visit the facebook.com/89.9FMKRPS

Also, don’t forget to subscribe to The Rundown from K R P S, available in Google Podcast and the Apple iTunes store. 

Check back tomorrow for more news headlines from the Four States on KRPS.

‘The Rundown’ News Headlines from KRPS for 07.22.20

Good morning, thanks for joining me for KRPS news headlines for Wednesday, July 22nd. 

Sunny and hot once again throughout Southeast Kansas today, a high near 90. Mostly clear and calm tonight, no storms in the forecast, a low of 72. More of the same as we end the week and into the weekend, clear, dry and warm, highs Thursday, Friday and Saturday in the lower ‘90s. 

Republican U.S. Senator Pat Roberts of Kansas is backing Congressman Roger Marshall’s bid to succeed him. 

Kansas superintendents say Governor Laura Kelly’s request to delay the school year by three weeks will help them obtain the equipment needed to reopen safely. 

Missouri Governor Mike Parson is defending himself against comments during an appearance last Friday on the Marc Cox Show, which broadcasts in St. Louis. Parson was replying to a question from Cox about his assessment of whether politicians in Missouri are overreacting to COVID-19. 

The mask discussion continued at the Joplin City Council meeting on Monday night. The city’s residents remain divided over the mask ordinance that went into effect on Saturday, July 11th. During the meeting, 3 Joplin residents spoke in favor of the law while 4 spoke in opposition. 

Sedgwick County’s health officer plans to issue a new public health order in response to a surge of coronavirus infections.

Now on to our feature of the day, 

Fear of losing a U.S. Senate seat in Kansas has some Republicans working to derail former Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s campaign in the final weeks before the August 4th primary. 

The Kansas News Service is a collaboration of KCUR, KMUW, Kansas Public Radio and High Plains Public Radio. It reports on health, the many factors that influence it and their connection to public policy.

Check back tomorrow for more news headlines from the Four States on KRPS.